TYSS: Capital T block

The Capital T block also uses flying geese units (as well as half square triangles) and finishes at 12″ (12 1/2″ unfinished). As with the Dutchman’s Puzzle, color placement can create all sorts of different looks, but for this block we’ll use two block fabrics and the background. If you’re following the white and bright layout, it’s red and aqua.

You will use the Skill Builder posts to create four HSTs and eight flying geese. The HSTs will finish at 4″ square (4 1/2″ unfinished, and the flying geese will finish at 4″ wide and 2″ high (4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ unfinished). Be aware of color placement – each flying geese unit will have two different “sky” fabrics. In this layout your background fabric will be the geese and your block fabrics will be the sky.

Half Square Triangles

Create two HSTs of each color. Although the strip and papers methods are both great for HSTS, the limited number of HSTs in this block means that the two squares with diagonal lines method is best in this instance. It creates exactly the number of HSTs you need without waste. For this method, you need:
(2) 5″ (or 5 1/4″ if you’d like a little more room to trim) squares of background fabric
(1) 5″ (or 5 1/4″) square of one block fabric
(1) 5″ (or 5 1/4″) square of another block fabric

Flying Geese

Skill Builder Series: Part 8A – Flying Geese

Skill Builder Series: Part 8B – Flying Geese

Method 1: Large and Small Squares

Skill Builder Series: Part 8B – Flying Geese
Skill Builder Series: Part 8B – Flying Geese
This is my favorite method for creating flying geese since it doesn’t waste fabric and you sew before cutting.

Cut (4) 3″ squares of one block fabric
Cut (4) 3″ squares of another block fabric
Cut (2) 5 1/2″ squares of background fabric

Follow Jeanne’s instructions for assembling the flying geese. In the first step (sewing two small squares to a large square), both small square should be the same block fabric. Then sew the other block fabric squares to the “heart.” You’ll have four geese with the “red” on the left and four with the “red” on the right.

Trim your flying geese units to 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″.

Method 2: Traditional

Skill Builder Series: Part 8A – Flying Geese
Although this is the traditional method for assembling flying geese, it can be tricky, especially since you’ll be working with bias edges. I don’t recommend it, but if you’d like to try it you need:

Four 3″ squares of one block fabric, cut diagonally once
Four 3″ squares of another block fabric, cut diagonally once
Two 5 1/2″ square of background fabric, cut diagonally both ways

Trim your flying geese units to 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″.

Method 3: Rectangle and Squares

Skill Builder Series: Part 8A – Flying Geese
If color placement has you worried, this method may be your best choice. You will waste a little fabric. If you haven’t made your pinwheels yet, you could use the extra HSTs from this block to create some of them.

Cut (4) 2 1/2″ squares of one block fabric
Cut (4) 2 1/2″ squares of another block fabric
Cut (8) 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles of background fabric

When you piece these, you’ll need four geese with “red” sky on the left and four geese with “red” sky on the right.

Method 4: Dimensional (One Seam)

Skill Builder Series: Part 8A – Flying Geese
This is a fun method for creating flying geese, but it adds a lot of bulk at the center and you will have flaps of fabric that you need to either sew down or be careful not to catch in the presser foot when you quilt it.

Cut (4) 2 1/2″ squares of one block fabric
Cut (4) 2 1/2″ squares of another block fabric
Cut (8) 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles of background fabric

When you piece these, you’ll need four geese with “red” sky on the left and four geese with “red” sky on the right.

Assembling the Block

Create four sets of flying geese, sewing two identical geese together for each unit. Lay out the flying geese units and HSTs so it looks like the Capital T block illustration above, then sew as you would a nine patch block. See this post for instructions on sewing a nine patch.

Advertisements

Thank you for sharing your thoughts! I try to reply to every comment, but sometimes it takes a few days. And sometimes, well... it has been known to drop off the radar. I'm easily distracted by shiny things.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s